Archive for the 'Nancy Stokey' Category

More on Arrow’s Explanatory Gap and the Milgrom-Stokey Argument

In my post yesterday, I discussed what I call Kenneth Arrow’s explanatory gap: the absence of any account in neoclassical economic theory of how the equilibrium price vector is actually arrived at and how changes in that equilibrium price vector result when changes in underlying conditions imply changes in equilibrium prices. I post below some revisions to several paragraphs in yesterday’s post supplemented by a more detailed discussion of the Milgrom-Stokey “no-trade theorem” and its significance. The following is drawn from a work in progress to be presented later this month at a conference celebrating the 150th anniversary of the publication of the Carl Menger’s Grundsätze der Volkswirtschaftslehre.

Thus, just twenty years after Arrow called attention to the explanatory gap in neoclassical theory by observing that neoclassical theory provides no explanation of how competitive prices can change, Paul Milgrom and Nancy Stokey (1982) turned Arrow’s argument on its head by arguing that, under rational expectations, no trading would ever occur at disequilibrium prices, because every potential trader would realize that an offer to trade at disequilibrium prices would not be made unless the offer was based on private knowledge and would therefore lead to a wealth transfer to the trader relying on private knowledge. Because no traders with rational expectations would agree to a trade at a disequilibrium price, there would be no incentive to seek or exploit private information, and all trades would occur at equilibrium prices.

This would have been a profound and important argument had it been made as a reductio ad absurdum to show the untenability of the rational-expectations as a theory of expectation formation, inasmuch as it leads to the obviously false factual implication that private information is never valuable and that no profitable trades are made by those possessed of private information. In concluding their paper, Milgrom and Stokey (1982) acknowledge the troubling implication of their argument:

Our results concerning rational expectations market equilibria raise anew the disturbing questions expressed by Beja (1977), Grossman and Stiglitz (1980), and Tirole (1980): Why do traders bother to gather information if they cannot profit from it? How does information come to be reflected in prices if informed traders do not trade or if they ignore their private information in making inferences? These questions can be answered satisfactorily only in the context of models of the price formation process; and our central result, the no-trade theorem, applies to all such models when rational expectations are assumed. (p. 17)

What Milgrom and Stokey seem not to have grasped is that the rational-expectations assumption dispenses with the need for a theory of price formation, inasmuch as every agent is assumed to be able to calculate what the equilibrium price is. They attempt to mitigate the extreme nature of this assumption by arguing that by observing price changes, traders can infer what changes in common knowledge would have implied the observed changes. That argument seems insufficient because any given change in price could be caused by more than one potential cause. As Scott Sumner has often argued, one can’t reason from a price change. If one doesn’t have independent knowledge of the cause of the price change, one can’t use the price change as a basis for further inference.

The Explanatory Gap and Mengerian Subjectivism

My last several posts have been focused on Marshall and Walras and the relationships and differences between the partial equilibrium approach of Marshall and the general-equilibrium approach of Walras and how that current state of neoclassical economics is divided between the more practical applied approach of Marshallian partial-equilibrium analysis and the more theoretical general-equilibrium approach of Walras. The divide is particularly important for the history of macroeconomics, because many of the macroeconomic controversies in the decades since Keynes have also involved differences between Marshallians and Walrasians. I’m not happy with either the Marshallian or Walrasian approach, and I have been trying to articulate my unhappiness with both branches of current neoclassical thinking by going back to the work of the forgotten marginal revolutionary, Carl Menger. I’ve been writing a paper for a conference later this month celebrating the 150th anniversary of Menger’s great work which draws on some of my recent musings, because I think it offers at least some hints at how to go about developing an improved neoclassical theory. Here’s a further sampling of my thinking which is drawn from one of the sections of my work in progress.

Both the Marshallian and the Walrasian versions of equilibrium analysis have failed to bridge an explanatory gap between the equilibrium state, whose existence is crucial for such empirical content as can be claimed on behalf of those versions of neoclassical theory, and such an equilibrium state could ever be attained. The gap was identified by one of the chief architects of modern neoclassical theory, Kenneth Arrow, in his 1958 paper “Toward a Theory of Price Adjustment.”

The equilibrium is defined in terms of a set of prices. In the Marshallian version, the equilibrium prices are assumed to have already been determined in all but a single market (or perhaps a subset of closely related markets), so that the Marshallian equilibrium simply represents how, in a single small or isolated market, an equilibrium price in that market is determined, under suitable ceteris-paribus conditions thereby leaving the equilibrium prices determined in other markets unaffected.

In the Walrasian version, all prices in all markets are determined simultaneously, but the method for determining those prices simultaneously was not spelled out by Walras other than by reference to the admittedly fictitious and purely heuristic tâtonnement process.

Both the Marshallian and Walrasian versions can show that equilibrium has optimal properties, but neither version can explain how the equilibrium is reached or how it can be discovered in practice. This is true even in the single-period context in which the Walrasian and Marshallian equilibrium analyses were originally carried out.

The single-period equilibrium has been extended, at least in a formal way, in the standard Arrow-Debreu-McKenzie (ADM) version of the Walrasian equilibrium, but this version is in important respects just an enhanced version of a single-period model inasmuch as all trades take place at time zero in a complete array of future state-contingent markets. So it is something of a stretch to consider the ADM model a truly intertemporal model in which the future can unfold in potentially surprising ways as opposed to just playing out a script already written in which agents go through the motions of executing a set of consistent plans to produce, purchase and sell in a sequence of predetermined actions.

Under less extreme assumptions than those of the ADM model, an intertemporal equilibrium involves both equilibrium current prices and equilibrium expected prices, and just as the equilibrium current prices are the same for all agents, equilibrium expected future prices must be equal for all agents. In his 1937 exposition of the concept of intertemporal equilibrium, Hayek explained the difference between what agents are assumed to know in a state of intertemporal equilibrium and what they are assumed to know in a single-period equilibrium.

If all agents share common knowledge, it may be plausible to assume that they will rationally arrive at similar expectations of the future prices. But if their stock of knowledge consists of both common knowledge and private knowledge, then it seems implausible to assume that the price expectations of different agents will always be in accord. Nevertheless, it is not necessarily inconceivable, though perhaps improbable, that agents will all arrive at the same expectations of future prices.

In the single-period equilibrium, all agents share common knowledge of equilibrium prices of all commodities. But in intertemporal equilibrium, agents lack knowledge of the future, but can only form expectations of future prices derived from their own, more or less accurate, stock of private knowledge. However, an equilibrium may still come about if, based on their private knowledge, they arrive at sufficiently similar expectations of future prices for their plans for their current and future purchases and sales to be mutually compatible.

Thus, just twenty years after Arrow called attention to the explanatory gap in neoclassical theory by observing that there is no neoclassical theory of how competitive prices can change, Milgrom and Stokey turned Arrow’s argument on its head by arguing that, under rational expectations, no trading would ever occur at prices other than equilibrium prices, so that it would be impossible for a trader with private information to take advantage of that information. This argument seems to suffer from a widely shared misunderstanding of what rational expectations signify.

Thus, in the Mengerian view articulated by Hayek, intertemporal equilibrium, given the diversity of private knowledge and expectations, is an unlikely, but not inconceivable, state of affairs, a view that stands in sharp contrast to the argument of Paul Milgrom and Nancy Stokey (1982), in which they argue that under a rational-expectations equilibrium there is no private knowledge, only common knowledge, and that it would be impossible for any trader to trade on private knowledge, because no other trader with rational expectations would be willing to trade with anyone at a price other than the equilibrium price.

Rational expectations is not a property of individual agents making rational and efficient use of the information from whatever source it is acquired. As I have previously explained here (and a revised version here) rational expectations is a property of intertemporal equilibrium; it is not an intrinsic property that agents have by virtue of being rational, just as the fact that the three angles in a triangle sum to 180 degrees is not a property of the angles qua angles, but a property of the triangle. When the expectations that agents hold about future prices are identical, their expectations are equilibrium expectations and they are rational. That the agents hold rational expectations in equilibrium, does not mean that the agents are possessed of the power to calculate equilibrium prices or even to know if their expectations of future prices are equilibrium expectations. Equilibrium is the cause of rational expectations; rational expectations do not exist if the conditions for equilibrium aren’t satisfied. See Blume, Curry and Easley (2006).

The assumption, now routinely regarded as axiomatic, that rational expectations is sufficient to ensure that equilibrium is automatic achieved, and that agents’ price expectations necessarily correspond to equilibrium price expectations is a form of question begging disguised as a methodological imperative that requires all macroeconomic models to be properly microfounded. The newly published volume edited by Arnon, Young and van der Beek Expectations: Theory and Applications from Historical Perspectives contains a wonderful essay by Duncan Foley that elucidates these issues.

In his centenary retrospective on Menger’s contribution, Hayek (1970), commenting on the inexactness of Menger’s account of economic theory, focused on Menger’s reluctance to embrace mathematics as an expository medium with which to articulate economic-theoretical concepts. While this may have been an aspect of Menger’s skepticism about mathematical reasoning, his recognition that expectations of the future are inherently inexact and conjectural and more akin to a range of potential outcomes of different probability may have been an even more significant factor in how Menger chose to articulate his theoretical vision.

But it is noteworthy that Hayek (1937) explicitly recognized that there is no theoretical explanation that accounts for any tendency toward intertemporal equilibrium, and instead merely (and in 1937!) relied an empirical tendency of economies to move in the direction of equilibrium as a justification for considering economic theory to have any practical relevance.


About Me

David Glasner
Washington, DC

I am an economist in the Washington DC area. My research and writing has been mostly on monetary economics and policy and the history of economics. In my book Free Banking and Monetary Reform, I argued for a non-Monetarist non-Keynesian approach to monetary policy, based on a theory of a competitive supply of money. Over the years, I have become increasingly impressed by the similarities between my approach and that of R. G. Hawtrey and hope to bring Hawtrey’s unduly neglected contributions to the attention of a wider audience.

My new book Studies in the History of Monetary Theory: Controversies and Clarifications has been published by Palgrave Macmillan

Follow me on Twitter @david_glasner

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